Aston Martin DB4 Saloon

 

This model went through a number of changes during its five year run. It has a claim to fame as being the first Corgi with an opening bit - in this case the bonnet, revealing that lovely straight six engine. Early ones had the engine as a separate casting (I guess as Corgi got better at opening bonnets they were able to incorporate it into the main body shell) a more detailed air scoop on the bonnet and the model number is cast into the baseplate. Later cars have a one-piece body casting and lack the detailed air-scoop and model number

The DB4 saloon was introduced in 1960 and was deleted in 1965. You will find it in primrose yellow or in red. Wheels can be turned, spun or cast spoke effect. It is the yellow ones with cast spokes which are the rarest and worth most.

The yellow one with the cast spoked wheels below is very early as demonstrated by the separate engine casting and oil holes over the axles - so unusual I'd never seen them on any other model until I found a Marks & Spencer 'Trophy' gold plated Vanwall with the same wheels.

How much of this casting became the Bond Aston DB5 I wonder? Oh, and talking of films, when Michael Caine retrieves his cash from under the bonnet of his DB4 in the Italian Job the bonnet hinges forwards, Corgi got their first ever opening feature wrong....They smashed that car up in the film too, one of only 70 convertibles ever made, never mind the gold robbery, smashing that Aston was the big crime in that movie.

309 Competition Model

OK, its a warm-over, a new model that is no more than last year's DB4 with a new paint job and racing numbers - gorgeous though isn't it? The DB4 remains the best looking Aston ever, bar none. Jeremy Clarkson and Richard Hammond can say what they like - none of the later ones come close to the perfect balance and design of this classic and beautiful motor car.

A brief note here on racing numbers. The model was released with number 3 on the door. I've had them with RN1, RN3 and RN7 as you can see. On the box there is a 17, in the advertising materials I've seen it is 1. van Cleemput says that 3 is correct, and any other number is due to shortages of the correct part on the production line.

The 309 Competition model was introduced in April 1962 and deleted in 1965. It is always white over jade with either spun hubs, or reportedly, spoked hubs.

         
Corgi Toys 218; Aston Martin DB4 Saloon; Yellow, Cast Spoked Wheels Corgi Toys 218; Aston Martin DB4 Saloon; Red, Turned Hubs Corgi Toys 218; Aston Martin DB4 Saloon; Yellow, Spun Hubs Corgi Toys 218; Aston Martin DB4 Saloon; Yellow, Turned Hubs Corgi Toys 309; Aston Martin DB4 Competition Model; Green & White, Spun Hubs
Corgi Toys 218; Aston Martin DB4 Saloon; Yellow, Cast Spoked Wheels Corgi Toys 218; Aston Martin DB4 Saloon; Red, Turned Hubs Corgi Toys 218; Aston Martin DB4 Saloon; Yellow, Spun Hubs Corgi Toys 218; Aston Martin DB4 Saloon; Yellow, Turned Hubs Corgi Toys 309; Aston Martin DB4 Competition Model; Green & White, RN3
Corgi Toys 309; Aston Martin DB4 Competition Model; Green & White; RN1 Corgi Toys 309; Aston Martin DB4 Competition Model; Green & White; RN7      
Corgi Toys 309; Aston Martin DB4 Competition Model; Green & White; RN1 Corgi Toys 309; Aston Martin DB4 Competition Model; Green & White; RN7      

 


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Last Edit: 26/05/2022 Page Added 22/05/2022